“Fresh tattoos are nice, but you can only judge a tattoo artist after you have seen their healed work” – Interview with József Török

“Fresh tattoos are nice, but you can only judge a tattoo artist after you have seen their healed work” – Interview with József Török

Have you always had an artistic background?

JT: I always loved to draw when I was a little kid, and later, when I finished the elementary school, I chose to study graphic design.

Were you studing or working before you started to pursue career in tattooing?

JT: I was 18 years old, when I first tried out tattooing, and it was a love at first sight. I was still studying at this time, and for 8 years tattooing was only a hobby for me. I had a lot of other jobs that I tried, I worked as a graphic designer, car seller, etc. Unfortunately I didn’t have time to practice as much as I wanted to, I could only make tattoos on weekends, that’s why it took a long time to be a full-time artist.

How did you first become interested in tattoos?

JT: One of my good old friends started to get tattoos, and once he offered me to go with him and asked if I was interested in getting a tattoo, that I can have one. That was the first time I saw how tattoos are made, and I knew that this is the thing I want to do in the rest of my life.

You are a realistic tattooer and a darn good one at that, what is it about realism that you love so much?

JT: Thank you! I don’t think that realism is the most complicated style, but it’s a challenge for me. It’s a challenge, because the final piece has to look exactly like on the reference picture, and not just until it heals up, but for a very long time. Fresh tattoos are nice, but you can only judge a tattoo artist after you have seen their healed work. Of course, a lot depends on the after care, but that’s an other topic..

Do you prefer to tattoo in colour or black and grey?

JT: Color realism is my absolute favorite, I can’t explain why, I just enjoy doing them a lot.

What was your first tattoo experience like?

JT: As a customer or an artist? Both of the situations were quite interesting, but inspirational, too.

Both!

JT:  It is a long long long story about one of my friend and me, his first tattoos, after my first tattoos, my first tattoo machines..but in short the first experience was when I saw my friend’s fresh and healed tattoos, I had saw the mistakes in the tattoo. But I thought that tattoos were so cool. After I got one, and I knew I would like get more and make some, I thought this was my path and that I will be tattooist.

What is the most meaningful tattoo you have created thus far?

JT: Ideally a tattoo is always important to the customer. I’m always about to do the best what I can.

Is there anyone you look up to in the tattoo industry?

JT: There are some artists, yes. It’s hard to explain, but there is one-one details I can see in every of their works which I really like. i mean the way they do it. For example I love how Victor Chil draws, and uses the
colors.

Who are you most grateful to when it comes to inspiration?

JT: To anybody who creates any kind of art that moves my fantasy.

Is there anything that you dislike about being a tattoo artist?

JT: It’s hard to plan anything, when my calendar is full for the next half year. I can’t get ill, because customers get angry when I need to move their appointments. It’s hard, when I work on a plan for hours, and they change their ideas about the tattoo. It’s hard, when they want to tell me, what and how to do, because they think they know it better. Or when I want to finish a tattoo, but they can’t handle the pain anymore, and give up earlier. I understand this, but I feel disappointed.

What has been the hardest moment in your career thus far, and what has been your favourite?

JT: I got a job offer from England, and I decided to move there. It was a hard time of my life, because I had to leave my home, but now I can tell that it was a good decision. These changes drove me to the right direction.

Is there any advice that you have been given that has stuck with you throughout your career?

JT: I was told that the most important thing is to stay respectful to the profession and to the customers, and a world-wide well known and respected Hungarian artist, Zsolt Sarkozy told me to not afraid of black color. 😀 I will never forget these words.

Do you have any advice for people who are looking to get their first tattoo?

JT: Choose a design which is personal, have a meaning, something that they won’t regret, which is worth the money, and the time to wait for it. And find the right artist who can create the best out from the idea.

Outside of work, what are your other interests?

JT: My most favorite hobby is fishing. Being in a peaceful place and waiting for the big catch. I also like to watch documentary movies, learn about the world, and like most men, I love cars.

Do you have any goals or challenges?

JT: To sleep enough! 😀 Improve myself and enjoy life.

Haha and Finally, How would someone go about getting a tattoo from yourself?

JT: I am a resident artist in a German tattoo shop (0711 Nadelspiel Tattooatelier), but I take guest spots and conventions during the year. If you want to know more, I always share the information on my social media sites.

facebook.com/TOROKTATTOO
instagram: @torok_tattoo_art

Thank you very much for your time Jozsef, it was a pleasure to know more about you.

About Tim

I'm a UK based staff writer for Tattoo-Map and an avid tattoo enthusiast with a penchant for realism...and skulls, because everyone loves skulls.